Medical Course Catalog

Biomedical Science Credit Mini Clinical Science
Credit
Anatomy and Embryology 1 Clinical Ethics 0.5-1
Biochemistry 0.5-1 Introduction to Clinical Medicine 0.5-1
Human Genetics and Cell Biology 1 Family Medicine 0.5-1
Human Behavior and Psychopathology 0.5-1 Internal Medicine 0.5-1
Immunology and Virology 1 Surgery Technology 0.5-1
Neuroscience 0.5-1 Geriatric Medicine 0.5-1
Medical Physiology 1 Pediatrics 0.5-1
Microbiology and Infection Disease 0.5-1 Obstetrics and Gynecology 0.5-1
Pathology 0.5-1 Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences 0.5-1
Pharmacology 0.5-1 Emergency Medicine 0.5-1
Human Systems 1 Neurology 0.5-1
Medicine, Health, and Society 0.5-1 Rehabilitation Medicine/Chronic Care 0.5-1
Medical Seminar 0.5-1
Scientific Research and Design 0.5-1

Fundamental of Biomedical Science (FBS) Curriculum:

Seattle Mini Medical School’s curriculum is designed for students who are serious about pursuing a career in medicine or any other healthcare professionals. For the first two years, students will study the Fundamental of Biomedical Science (FBS) similar to, but shorter version of, an initial of two-year preclinical portion in the medical school. Students will receive a series of lectures and hands on projects with a specific set of medical skills that correlate with the information learned from the lectures.  Across the FBS curriculum, a series of clinical skills provide students with exposure to patient care-related learning activities, and offer students the opportunity to practice and develop their medical interviewing and physical examination skills.  Students will be provided a series of handout for their reference and study.  There will be sessions that parents are invited to see their students in action, performing the procedures they learned during the program and hearing a review of the medical school admissions process. The below curriculum summaries were adopted from: University of Washington School of Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, and Dartmouth Geisel School of Medicine.

Outside speakers, seminars, webinars, workshops, hands-on, lecturing, note taking, scientific reading, scientific writing, and presentations are essential parts of these courses. Writing in this course involves students’ personal reflections on their understanding of the topics, workings of disease in society, write-ups of epidemiological and case studies, journal entries, and descriptive narratives of the human systems.

MMS begins with a study of the normal human body, and its processes at the molecular and cellular levels. The medical school curriculum that integrated the disciplines of Introduction courses to Anatomy and Embryology, Biochemistry, Cell Biology, and Genetics. Human Behavior and Psychopathology, Immunology, Neuroscience, Physiology, Microbiology and Infection Disease, Hematology, Pathology, Pharmacology, and Organ Systems: Cardiovascular, Respiratory, Renal, Musculoskeletal, Gastrointestinal, Central and Peripheral Nervous, Endocrine, and Reproductive Systems.

Anatomy and Embryology

State Course Code: 03054                                             Subject: Science           Grade: 9-12       Credits: 0.5-1 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring                    Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry. Completion Time: Competency-based, one or two semester.

Descriptions: The Human Anatomy course presents the gross structure and function of the human body as it relates to the practice of medicine. By using model and multimedia simulation of surface, radiological, and cadaver anatomy, students acquire a three-dimensional understanding of structural relationships in the living body.  Videos illustrating the anatomy of selected regions of the body are available for on-demand viewing. Lectures stress important aspects of anatomy, especially as they relate to medical practice. The Medical Embryology course covers embryologic development from ovulation through birth, and is organized by organ systems. Topics are integrated with Human Anatomy to facilitate understanding of anatomical relationships, selected birth defects, and anatomical variants. Following an introductory overview lecture, the remainder of the course is completed in an online self-study format. Course materials include a complete syllabus with self-study questions, a companion website, a CD-ROM with animations of embryologic development, and supplementary textbooks on library reserve. The course culminates in an informal journal club that explores selected topics of relevance to modern developmental biology and medicine. Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Describe basic principles of embryology and general anatomical concepts.
  2. Develop a broad understanding of the structural organization of the human body at the macroscopic level.
  3. Develop a foundation for physical examination and functional assessment of the human organism.
  4. Describe the thoracic, abdomen, and pelvis cavities and the viscera they contain.
  5. Describe the three-dimensional interrelationships & the general principles of blood & nerve supply.
  6. Describe the gross anatomy of skull, head and neck.
  7. Provide anatomical basis for cross sectional and 3D digital imaging.

 

Biochemistry

State Course Code: 03059                                             Subject: Science           Grade: 9-12       Credits: 0.5-1 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring                    Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry. Completion Time: Competency-based, one or two semester.

Descriptions: The Medical Biochemistry course introduces the fundamentals of modern molecular biology and biochemistry as applied to medicine. The course is divided into four blocks: The first block enhances your understanding of proteins including their structure and function. We explore the basic amino acid building blocks and how differences in structures are manifested into a variety of functional states. The second block explores nucleic acids, macromolecular machines, and their regulation on a molecular level. Sections three and four delve into the intrinsic nature of metabolism. Section three deals with the fundamentals of carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism including a variety of disease states arising from genetic and environmental factors. Section four covers the breadth of lipid metabolism, with major emphasis given to diseases such as diabetes, obesity, and atherosclerosis. Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Solve problems in diagnosis and treatment of human disease by application of biochemical principles.
  2. Use the primary medical and scientific literature as a resource for learning and problem solving.
  3. Define, describe and contrast functions of genes and macromolecules in normal and pathologic contexts.
  4. Define and describe systemic metabolic biochemistry in terms of genes and molecules.
  5. Deduce therapeutic mechanisms from established molecular mechanisms.
  6. Interpret new medical discoveries in terms of fundamental principles of biochemistry
  7. Explain the molecular basis of diseases that affect cellular function or development.

Cell Biology

State Course Code: 03052                                             Subject: Science           Grade: 9-12       Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring                    Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry. Completion Time: Competency-based, one semester.

Descriptions: The Biology of Cells and Tissues course consists of lectures and coordinated laboratory sessions that introduce the fine structure and function of cells, tissues, and organ systems of the human body, primarily as observed at the resolution of light microscopy. Emphasis is placed on structure-function relationships between different cell types in human tissues and organ systems, as well as on how alterations in cell architecture and cell behaviors lead to disease. The first part of the course covers the functional morphology of cells and their organelles, the biochemical composition of cellular components and products, features of cell surfaces and cellular movement, and the basics of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The remainder of the course is a systematic survey of the body’s organ systems, with an emphasis on the functions of specialized cell types in each organ. Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Recognize the structure of the components of the cell.
  2. Explain the correlation between the structure and function of cell components, including organelles.
  3. Predict how dysfunction of cellular elements would affect cell appearance and function.
  4. Identify and describe the components of tissues.
  5. Explain the organization of tissue components and the correlation with function.
  6. Predict how dysfunction of tissue components would affect tissue appearance and function.
  7. Describe the tissue components of organs.
  8. Explain how microscopic structure of organs contributes to organ function.
  9. Predict the effect of dysfunction of cellular or tissue elements on organ appearance and function.
  10. Differentiate organs and tissues by appearance.
  11. Predict the functional states of organs and tissues by appearance.
  12. Describe techniques and tools in study of the structure and function of cells, tissues and organs.
  13. Practice and demonstrate systematic problem-­‐solving skills.
  14. Set up, use and troubleshoot a microscope.
  15. Communicate cell, organ and tissue composition with fellow students and faculty
  16. Practice team skills by participating in team exercises.

 

Genetics

State Course Code: 03059                                             Subject: Science           Grade: 9-12       Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring                    Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry. Completion Time: Competency-based, one semester.

Descriptions: The Medical Genetics course introduces basic principles of human genetics and their application to clinical medicine. Topics include chromosome abnormalities, genetic patterns of inheritance, inborn errors of metabolism, multifactorial inheritance, population genetics, gene mapping and identification, genetic screening, cancer genetics, pharmacogenetics, gene therapy, genetic counseling, and ethical issues, and decision-making in medical genetics. The course consists primarily of self-study assignments that precede interactive, classroom-based problem-solving sessions led by a faculty expert in each topic. In-class quizzes are administered to provide students with ample formative feedback throughout the course. Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Describe what genes are, how they are organized and controlled, what they do and how they segregate.
  2. Describe the nature of mutations and permutations and how they contribute to human variability and to disease.
  3. Describe the patterns of inheritance for autosomal dominant/recess, sex-linked, and mitochondrial inheritance.
  4. Describe how genes are organized into chromosomes, mitosis and meiosis, and transmitted from parent to child.
  5. Describe the clinical manifestations of common numeric, structural, and mosaic chromosomal anomalies.
  6. Describe how polymorphism, gene linkage, and human gene mapping are used in medicine.
  7. Describe the multifactorial nature of most human traits, both normal and abnormal, and how inheritance works.
  8. Describe the role of genetics in the pathogenesis of neoplasms and in the predisposition of malignancies.
  9. Identify common molecular and cytogenetic diagnostic techniques and how they are applied to genetic disorders.
  10. Describe the procedures available for prenatal genetic diagnosis and diseases that can be detected prenatally.
  11. Identify and describe the approaches to treatment of genetic diseases.
  12. Students will be able to elicit a comprehensive medical genetic history and construct an appropriate pedigree.
  13. Students will be able to demonstrate sympathy, a non-judgmental and non-directive attitude, recognize their own limitations, seek consultation whenever necessary, and become life-long self-motivated learners

Human Behavior and Psychopathology

State Course Code: 03052                                             Subject: Science           Grade: 9-12       Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring                    Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry. Completion Time: Competency-based, one semester.

Description: The Human Behavior course examines the basic science of human behavior that is relevant to the understanding of mental disorders. A variety of educational media (lectures, videos, computer media) are used to examine human psychosocial development and the biopsychosocial underpinnings of behavior. Course content is coordinated with small group sessions allowing students to practice clinical interview and examination skills, reflect on how patients and physicians react to illness, and recognize salient aspects of the physician’s professional roles. Major psychiatric disorders are defined and described and a systematic approach to differential diagnosis is presented. Conceptual development, pathogenesis, epidemiology, nomenclature and the terminology used in psychiatry are discussed. Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Apply knowledge of normal biopsychosocial development across the lifespan to clinical scenarios.
  2. Recognize and identify behavioral and developmental factors in primary care.
  3. Recognize and identify psychosocial mediators of biological and behavioral factors in health and illness.
  4. Identify major health risk behaviors and common principles of behavior change.
  5. Describe the impact of psychosocial stressors on illness, patients, and families.
  6. Recognize and describe the impact of culture, development, and responses in the doctor-patient relationship.
  7. List the components of the Mental Status Exam.
  8. Begin to develop skills on how to conduct a psychiatric interview.
  9. Discuss how to assess and manage a suicidal patient.
  10. Define and distinguish affective disorders.
  11. Define and distinguish psychotic disorders.
  12. Define and distinguish anxiety disorders.
  13. Define and distinguish personality disorders.
  14. Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of psychotherapy.
  15. Demonstrate a general understanding of the biological basis of psychiatry.

 

Immunology and Virology

State Course Code: 03052                                             Subject: Science           Grade: 9-12       Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring                    Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry. Completion Time: Competency-based, 1 or 2 semester.

Descriptions: The Fundamentals of Immunology course introduces the components of the immune system, their locations in the human body, and their interactions in different clinical contexts. Students learn how the immune system senses and attempts to eliminate pathogens, and how selected pathogens evade it to cause disease. First, the genes and molecules that play key roles in the immune system – including antigens, antigen receptors, antibodies, complement, major histocompatibility complex loci, chemokines, and cytokines – are introduced. The interactions between innate and acquired are then discussed. Finally, medically relevant forms of immune dysregulation and intervention are explored, including vaccines, immunomodulators, hypersensitivities, immunodeficiency, autoimmunity, graft-versus-host disease, transplantation immunology, and tumor immunology. Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the cells, products, and effector responses of the immune system
  2. Describe an immune response from initiation to resolution
  3. Describe T and B cell receptor diversity and antigen recognition
  4. Explain the role of tolerance, when and how it occurs, and consequences of autoimmunity
  5. Compare innate and adaptive immune responses
  6. Describe how pathogens are recognized, presented to the immune system, and how influences vaccine design
  7. Describe and explain the key interactions during T cell and B cell interactions
  8. Describe and compare the four types of hypersensitivity
  9. Explain and compare immune processes during transplantation and tumor immunity
  • Explain how specific drugs alter the function of the immune system
  • Explain the consequences of specific immune deficiencies and approaches to treat them
  • Describe how specific immunological tests function and are used in diagnosis
  • Describe the immune basis, pathophysiology, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment of a disease
  • Function as a team member and coordinate an effective presentation
  • Provide presentation on the important characteristics of a disease, diagnosis, and treatment.
  • Lead a discussion of a topic and help fellow students understand key issues
  • Interpret data from experiments and draw appropriate conclusions from the data.
  • Recognize the structure of viruses.
  • Describe the replication strategy of viruses.
  • Explain pathogenesis of diseases caused by viruses.
  • Identify how viruses spread from person to person.
  • Recognize an epidemic or pandemic of virus infection.
  • Describe tools and techniques in study of the structure, life cycle, pathogenesis, and diagnosis of viruses and their clinical signs.
  • Distinguish replicative virus infection from virus latency.
  • Explain the role of the immune system in the control of virus infection.
  • Recognize current strategies to prevent virus infection by vaccination
  • Recognize current strategies to control virus infection or pathogenesis by immunological intervention.
  • Recognize current strategies to control virus infection or pathogenesis by pharmacological intervention.
  • Describe the growth differences between cells transformed by oncogenic DNA and RNA viruses compared to normal cells.
  • Relate tumor suppressor genes and the control of normal cell growth.
  • Interpret how tumor suppressor gene products intersect growth and survival pathways and how tumor viruses interact with these molecules and their pathways.
  • Differentiate the processes involved in the antitumor effects of certain viruses.
  • Practice and demonstrate systematic problem-¬‐solving skills in basic and clinical virology.
  • Integrate strategies learned in the context of virus systems into the design of experiments that address other systems

 

Medical Neuroscience

State Course Code: 03052                                             Subject: Science           Grade: 9-12       Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring                    Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry. Completion Time: Competency-based, one semester.

Descriptions: Medical neuroscience is an integrated course that is designed to introduce elements of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neuropharmacology, with illustrations from neuropathology and clinical neurology. Lectures use frequent clinical examples and much of neuroanatomy is taught through extended team-based learning exercises and jigsaw sessions. There are guided topographic and cross-sectional anatomy labs with strong emphasis on correlation with normal radiographic anatomy. Student proficiency is assessed through quizzes and written exams (including a practical exam component), as well as performance in the team-based learning exercise. Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Define the terms commonly used to describe the nervous system and its functions.
  2. Explain the cellular and molecular basis for excitability, conductivity, synaptic function and plasticity of the nervous system.
  3. Identify and describe the major features of the brain that are identifiable on gross inspection and in coronal, axial and sagittal section.
  4. Identify the organization and distribution of the major blood vessels of the brain and describe the regulation of blood flow and the transit of nutrients into and out of the brain.
  5. Describe general concepts in development and repair of functions of the nervous system and consequences of disruption of these processes.
  6. Explain the formation and flow of cerebrospinal fluid.
  7. Describe the major tracts of the brain and identify the functions and the consequences of damage to the tracts.
  8. Describe the major components of the sensory systems of the nervous system and predict the consequences of damage to these systems.
  9. Describe the major components of the motor systems and predict the consequences of damage to these systems.
  10. Describe the substrates for the major behavioral and cognitive functions of the brain and predict the consequences of damage to these systems.
  11. Describe the control of integrated functions of the brain including neuroendocrine function, autonomic control, emotional regulation, appetite, and sleep.
  12. Describe techniques and tools in study of the structure and function of the brain including neurophysiological and neuroimaging.
  13. Practice and demonstrate systematic problem‐solving skills.
  14. Practice communication of neuroscience concepts with fellow students and faculty.
  15. Practice team skills, including respectful, responsible and professional participation.
  16. Read critically, evaluate, and assess medical information and scientific literature about biomedical topics and questions.
  17. Help colleagues by contributing constructive suggestions

 

Medical Physiology I (Respiratory and Cardiovascular)

State Course Code: 03055                                             Subject: Science           Grade: 9-12       Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring                    Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry. Completion Time: Competency-based, one semester.

Descriptions: The purpose of both of the Medical Physiology courses is to help first year medical students acquire an understanding of the fundamental organization and functions of each of several major organ systems and of the integration and interactions of these systems with one another. The integrated goal is to comprehend natural processes and to observe how these processes enable the individual to adapt and survive in the face of changing needs and resources. The emphasis is on understanding mechanisms rather than on memorizing details, but sufficient detail must be included to serve as a basis for later understanding of abnormal function and its consequences in disease states and for understanding rational therapy with drugs and other interventions. Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the physical arrangement and roles of the various components of the cardiorespiratory system.
  2. Explain the ionic bases for the resting membrane potential in a cardiac muscle cell and the development and propagation of an action potential across the myocardium.
  3. Explain the role of calcium in cardiac muscle tension development and relaxation following action potential excitation, and discuss the influences of the length tension relationship, contractility and load upon muscle shortening.
  4. Explain the electrical and mechanical events of the cardiac cycle and show how muscle characteristics and cardiac geometry combine to determine cardiac pumping performance as displayed by cardiac cycle pressure-volume trajectories and ventricular function curves.
  5. Explain how the characteristics of vascular geometry and flowing blood determine the load upon the ventricles.
  6. Describe the manner in which tissue perfusion is regulated at a local level, how materials are exchanged in the microcirculation, and how specific tissue beds differ in their local regulation responses.
  7. Explain the short- and long-term regulation of arterial blood pressure under normal conditions and during conditions posed by gravity, blood loss, ventricular failure and other stresses.
  8. Describe the static and dynamic force requirements, produced by respiratory muscles or mechanical assistance, to produce gas flow in airways of normal individuals and how pulmonary disease affects these.
  9. Explain the fundamental principles of convective transport and gas exchange between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood, and the exchange in tissues following circulatory transport.
  10. Discuss the central control of breathing and the afferent and efferent nerves involved.
  11. Describe the changes in circulation and respiration at birth.
  12. Describe cardiorespiratory responses and adaptations to exercise.
  13. Discuss the impact of cardiorespiratory disease on well-being and the quality of life.
  14. Communicate effectively with fellow students and faculty regarding principles of cardiorespiratory physiology.
  15. Meet professional responsibilities by providing thoughtful evaluations of course

 

Medical Physiology II (Endocrinology and Renal)

State Course Code: 03055                                             Subject: Science           Grade: 9-12       Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring                    Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry. Completion Time: Competency-based, one semester.

Descriptions: Medical Physiology II is a continuation of Medical Physiology I, providing a more advanced and in-depth understanding of the fundamental organization and functions of each of several major organ systems and of the integration and interactions of these systems with one another. The emphasis in this course is on the physiology of the endocrine and renal systems. Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Explain the roles of the endocrine system in maintaining homeostasis, integrating growth and development, responding to environmental insults and promoting successful reproduction.
  2. Discuss the definition of a hormone in terms of its general properties.
  3. Differentiate among endocrine, paracrine and autocrine systems.
  4. Describe the different classes and chemical structures of hormones.
  5. Identify the glands, organs, tissues and cells that synthesize and secrete hormones and associated compounds.
  6. Describe the synthesis and modes of secretion of hormones.
  7. Explain how the secretion of hormones is regulated, including the principles of negative and positive feedback mechanisms.
  8. Explain the importance of patterns of hormone secretion such as pulsatile, diurnal and cyclicle.
  9. Explain how hormones are transported and the consequences of the reversible binding of many hormones by plasma proteins.
  10. Explain the basis of hormone assays and assessment of biological activity.
  11. Describe how hormones are metabolized in blood and tissues and the importance of hormone activation and degradation.
  12. Discuss the clearance and excretion of hormones and their metabolic derivatives.
  13. Define and discuss the physiological actions of hormones relating them possible to human disorders.
  14. Explain the consequences of under-¬‐ and overproduction of hormones.
  15. Describe and discuss the roles of hormone receptors in hormone action including their location, type and signaling pathways.
  16. Compare and contrast the different mechanisms of action of hormones: i.e. those exerted by modulation of gene expression; those achieved by changes in protein activity.
  17. Identify and discuss the integration of the endocrine system in general with focus on specific interactions.
  18. Apply endocrinological principles to determine the pathophysiological basis and consequences of specific endocrine disorders.
  19. Communicate effectively and collegially with peers and faculty in conferences and to evaluate, assess, discuss and/or present relevant scientific literature.
  20. Discuss the physiological distribution and the control of turnover and utilization of critically important elements and substances such as calcium, phosphorus and energy-¬‐rich compounds.
  21. Discuss the molecular, biochemical and physiological effects of hormone on cells and tissues.
  22. Read critically, understand, evaluate, and assess scientific literature about endocrine function and pathology.

 

Microbiology and Infection Disease

State Course Code: 03060                                             Subject: Science           Grade: 9-12       Credits: 0.5-1(HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring                    Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry. Completion Time: Competency-based, 1 or 2 semester.

Descriptions: This course introduces the pathogenesis and immunity of infectious diseases, and natural barriers. Microbiology, epidemiology, clinical manifestations and control of representative bacterial, fungal, parasitic and viral infectious diseases are covered. Chemotherapeutics and principles of chemotherapy, sterilization, principles of asepsis, nosocomial and iatrogenic infections are discussed. Objectives, at the end of the course, students should be able to:

  1. Compare and contrast essential features of viruses, the prokaryotic cell, the fungal cell, and the mammalian cell.
  2. Describe essential features of bacterial structure, metabolism, genetics, and classification.
  3. Describe essential features of fungal morphology and growth.
  4. Describe essential features of viral structure, genetics, and growth.
  5. Compare and contrast distinguishing features of parasite classes, including the life cycles of parasitic pathogens.
  6. Describe the major classes of antibiotics, including anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-viral, and anti-parasitic drugs, and describe their mechanisms of action, and mechanisms of acquired resistance.
  7. For selected infectious diseases and syndromes:
  8. Identify the pathogens of major importance
  9. Describe the affected populations and modes of transmission
  10. Describe the major clinical manifestations of disease
  11. Explain the mechanisms of pathogenesis
  12. Explain the principles of diagnosis, therapy, and prevention

 

Pathology

State Course Code: 03052                                             Subject: Science           Grade: 9-12       Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring                    Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry. Completion Time: Competency-based, one semester.

Descriptions: Anatomic and Clinical Pathology presents the etiology, pathogenesis, and pathophysiology of general disease processes and of specific diseases of organ systems, as well as the clinical consequences of disease. Students acquire information from several sources, including a limited number of lectures, course syllabus, textbook readings, online materials, glass-slide laboratory sessions, and demonstrations of gross tissue specimens by pathology faculty. Students prepare for small-group case discussions by viewing online case materials during designated independent study time. There is also an opportunity to view an autopsy at the Medical Examiner’s office. Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the basics of normal and abnormal cell growth.
  2. Explain the primary mechanisms of cell injury.
  3. Describe the basics of the inflammatory process.
  4. Describe basic level abnormalities caused by inflammation.
  5. Describe basic level abnormalities of the vascular system.
  6. Describe basic level abnormalities caused by neoplasia.
  7. Describe the sequelae of thrombosis.
  8. Give the definitions and basic features of the most common neoplasms.
  9. Describe the classification schemes of the most common neoplasms (except for leukemia and lymphoma).
  10. Describe the natural history of the most common neoplasms (except for leukemia and lymphoma).
  11. Describe the clinical management of the most common neoplasms (except for leukemia and lymphoma).
  12. Describe the morphologic aspects of common infections and other non-neoplastic diseases that affect the major organs.
  13. Discuss the role of diagnostic pathology in clinical medicine, particularly with regard to diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment.
  14. Discuss the role of tissue biopsy and interpretation in clinical medicine (diagnosis, prognosis, and choice of therapy).

 

Pharmacology

State Course Code: 14253                                             Subject: Science           Grade: 9-12       Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring                    Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry. Completion Time: Competency-based, one semester.

Descriptions: Medical Pharmacology is first approached as a basic biomedical science and later focuses on therapeutics and clinical pharmacology. After a thorough introduction to the general principles of pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics, the pharmacological and toxicological properties of the major classes of drugs are covered. Emphasis is placed on understanding mechanisms of drug-induced modifications of physiological functions. Lectures are supplemented with clinical correlations that explore the rational use of drugs in the management of disease. Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Enumerate and begin developing skills to interpret information on absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs and apply such information in solving problems
  2. Enumerate, in general, how drugs interact with receptors and the general consequences of such interactions
  3. Identify the major factors influencing the effects of drugs in humans and their interactions with one another
  4. Identify the major classes of and mechanisms of action of antibiotic, anti–cancer, autonomic and cardiovascular drugs and the primary characteristics of major prototype drugs in each class
  5. Identify the major effects and common adverse reactions of major antibiotics and of prototype drugs acting on the autonomic and cardiovascular systems.
  6. Identify common indications, contra–indications and limitations, including major adverse reactions, of a number of classes of clinically important drugs
  7. Describe and appreciate the implications of the placebo effect in human medicine and research

 

Hematology

State Course Code: 03052                                             Subject: Science           Grade: 9-12       Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring                    Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry. Completion Time: Competency-based, one semester.

Descriptions: Familiarizes students with the basic pathophysiologic mechanisms leading to disturbances of red cell, white cell and platelet production as well as abnormalities of hemostasis presenting clinical problems. Pathophysiology, rather than minute details of individual disease, is stressed. Problem-based learning sessions are a significant portion of this course as well as in the musculoskeletal course. Objectives, at the end of the course, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the normal development, function and turnover of red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
  2. Describe the pathophysiology of the different types of disorders of red blood cells and iron homeostasis.
  3. Describe the cellular and biochemical mechanisms of blood clotting and testing of these systems.
  4. Describe the pathophysiology of disorders of hemostasis and thrombosis.
  5. Describe the pathophysiology of benign and malignant disorders of white blood cells.
  6. Perform appropriate diagnostic evaluation of patients with blood disorders.
  7. Propose possible treatment options for patients with different types of blood disorders.
  8. Describe blood typing, blood component preparation, indications, and potential complications of transfusions

 

Musculoskeletal System

State Course Code: 03052                                             Subject: Science           Grade: 9-12       Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring                    Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry.

Time: Competency-based, one semester.

Descriptions: Study includes gross, surface, applied and X-ray anatomy of system including entire spine but excluding head and neck. Other topics include histology of bone, cartilage, tendon-myotendinal junction and joints, musculoskeletal trauma and healing, pathology and clinical manifestations of other degenerative, inflammatory, metabolic, nutritional and congenital disorders. At the end of the course, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the origins, insertions, actions, and innervations of the muscles of the upper and lower limbs.
  2. Understand anatomical, physiological, and pathological bases of normal and abnormal physical signs in the musculoskeletal system.
  3. Demonstrate proficiency in finding key musculoskeletal anatomic landmarks on the living human subject.
  4. Recognize how the musculoskeletal system is affected by aging.
  5. Describe common traumatic conditions of the musculoskeletal system, including musculoskeletal emergencies.
  6. Compare and contrast the characteristics of the common arthritic conditions.
  7. Describe common congenital and perinatal pathologies that may affect the musculoskeletal system.
  8. Distinguish musculoskeletal pathologic processes from normal on plain radiographs.

 

Nervous System

State Course Code: 03052                                             Subject: Science           Grade: 9-12       Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring                    Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry.

Time: Competency-based, one semester.

Descriptions: Integrated approach to the normal structure and function of the nervous system, including the eye. Neuropathological examples are presented as well as clinical manifestations of neurological disease. Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Communicate effectively with colleagues using correct discipline-specific terminology.
  2. Identify gross anatomical features of the brain and cord
  3. Describe the blood vessels of the brain and the territories supplied by each.
  4. Describe the formation, circulation and absorption of cerebrospinal fluid.
  5. Interpret 2D and 3D clinical images based on an understanding of the 3D structural organization of the CNS.
  6. Describe common research techniques in neuroscience.
  7. Relate the developmental sequence of the nervous system to adult form and to common congenital conditions.
  8. Describe the somatosensory, auditory, visual, taste, olfactory and motor pathways and the results of lesions in them at each level of the neuraxis.
  9. Describe the thalamus and cerebral cortex in terms of connections, functions, and effects of damage on sensory, motor and higher cognitive function.
  10. Describe the hypothalamus and limbic system and their role in homeostasis and in the regulation and expression of drive-related, emotional and cognitive functions.
  11. Recognize the common signs and symptoms that indicate a disorder in nervous system function.
  12. Relate some common pathologies of nervous system to disturbance, damage or dysfunction of specific structures, connections and/or physiology of neurons.
  13. Determine the site of a neurological lesion based on an interpretation of signs and symptoms in motor and sensory pathways or in cognitive behavior, and conversely, given the location of a lesion, predict the likely signs and symptoms the patient will exhibit.
  14. Read with understanding about clinically relevant advances in the rapidly advancing field of neuroscience.

 

Gastrointestinal System

State Course Code: 03052                                             Subject: Science           Grade: 9-12       Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring                    Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry.

Time: Competency-based, one semester.

Descriptions: Anatomy of gastrointestinal system; physiology and pathology of digestion and hepatic function; physical and laboratory examination. Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Outline an algorithm for the differential diagnosis of difficulty with swallowing.
  2. Explain the regulation of gastric acid secretion and how your explanation relates to the treatment of peptic ulcer disease.
  3. Describe the autoregulation of pancreatic endocrine, and exocrine secretion during the digestion of a meal.
  4. Give a description of normal fat absorption, and the derangements, which lead to fat malabsorption.
  5. Identify the principles of water and electrolyte absorption so that you can describe the abnormalities in normal absorption, which leads to diarrhea.
  6. Explain how cirrhosis of the liver can lead to esophageal variceal bleeding, ascites, and encephalopathy.
  7. Formulate a differential diagnosis of jaundice.
  8. Explain how cholesterol gallstones form.

 

Reproductive System

State Course Code: 03052                                             Subject: Science           Grade: 9-12       Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring                    Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry.

Time: Competency-based, one semester.

Descriptions: Traces normal development of reproductive function in human beings including formation and maturation of ova and sperm, gamete transport, fertilization, menstruation, implantation, physiology and endocrinology of placenta, intrauterine development and nutritional requirements of growing fetus, normal pregnancy, parturition, lactation and adaptation of newborns to extrauterine life. Provides information concerning infertility problems, family planning techniques and demography of human population. Objectives, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the genetic, molecular and physiological basis for sexual differentiation of the developing human and to recognize the major genetic and phenotypic abnormalities of sexual development and their etiology
  2. Describe the process of gametogenesis in the male and female, including the process of meiosis in developing male and female germ cells, spermatogenesis, and oogenesis, and describe how genetic abnormalities can occur during these processes. Understand the process of implantation and placentation
  3. Describe the physiological regulation of the menstrual cycle, its pathophysiology and potential treatments for its primary disorders
  4. Describe the physiological mechanisms that govern pubertal development, and recognize normal and abnormal benchmarks of progression
  5. Describe the physiological regulation of normal testicular function, including the control of spermatogenesis and testosterone secretion by the gonadotropins, and recognize problems related to impaired reproductive function in men
  6. Identify the available forms of hormonal; barrier, and chemical contraception for the female and male, understands their limitations, risks, benefits and contraindications. Understand the benefits of family planning for parents, families, society, and environmental stewardship. Describe the methods, procedures, and complications associated with medical and surgical abortions
  7. Recognize the common disorders of fertility in males and females
  8. Describe the logical work-up of an infertile couple and identify the most common therapeutic strategies for its treatment, along with their limitations, risks, and relative costs
  9. Describe the normal physiological adaptations to pregnancy, and know its major pathophysiology, including gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. Describe the progression and time-course of normal labor and delivery and recognize the signature events (including timing) the might herald problems for either the baby or mother – before, during, and after delivery.

 

Skin System

State Course Code: 03052                                             Subject: Science           Grade: 9-12       Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring                    Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry.

Time: Competency-based, one semester.

Descriptions: Topics include gross and microscopic anatomy, physiology, protection, temperature control, pigmentation and photosensitivity. Pathology and genetics of skin abnormalities including tumors, introduction to clinical evaluation, physical examination and illustrating examples of inflammatory, vascular, immunological (including drug hypersensitivity) and neoplastic diseases will be cover. At the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Apply the knowledge of skin biology to understanding the pathomechanisms of real skin diseases
  2. Thoroughly and sensitively conduct a physical examination of the skin
  3. Competently and confidently describe skin lesion morphology in vivo
  4. Experience through the patient’s perspective the impact of skin disease on health and well-being
  5. Identify, describe, and differentiate the more common skin cancers

 

Medicine, Health, and Society

State Course Code: 03063                                             Subject: Science           Grade: 9-12       Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring                    Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry.

Time: Competency-based, one semester.

Descriptions: Addresses interrelationships between provision of medical care and non-biological factors that influence health. Issues include relative importance of society, environment and individual choice in determining health status; impact of organizational, economic, and political influences on medical practice and choice; measurement of costs, risks, benefits and efficacy of diagnostic and therapeutic technologies; importance of these concepts in responsible and scientific decision-making. Interdisciplinary course including medical, pharmacy, nursing, and other allied health care students. Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Discuss access to health care and the factors, including race, ethnicity, and social class, that influence access.
  2. Outline the major factors related to the financing of health care, with topics including employer-based health insurance, Medicare, Medicaid and safety net systems for the uninsured.
  3. Outline the major factors related to the quality of heath care, with topics including medical errors, performance measurement, and systems approaches to improving quality.
  4. Discuss the roles of risk behaviors in illness prevention.
  5. Discuss/analyze the roles of clinical preventive services, determinants of health in illness prevention.
  6. Make a persuasive oral presentation on a health policy topic.

 

Medical Seminar

State Course Code: 22106                                             Subject: Science           Grade: 7-12       Credits: 0.5-1 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring                    Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry.

Time: Competency-based, one or two semester.

Descriptions: Seminar courses vary widely, but typically offer a small peer group the opportunity to investigate areas of interest. Course objectives may include improvement of research and investigatory skills, presentation skills, interpersonal skills, group process skills, and problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. Seminars aimed at juniors and seniors often include a college and career exploration and planning component.

Scientific Research and Design

State Course Code: 03212                                             Subject: Science           Grade: 10-12     Credits: 0.5-5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring                    Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry.

Time: Competency-based.

Descriptions: In Scientific Research and Design courses, students conceive of, design, and complete a project using scientific inquiry and experimentation methodologies. Emphasis is typically placed on safety issues, research protocols, controlling or manipulating variables, data analysis, and a coherent display of the project and its outcome(s).

 

Mini Medical School—Workplace Experience

State Course Code: 03998                                             Subject: Science           Grade: 10-12     Credits: 0.5-5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring                    Prerequisites: After second year

Completion Time: Competency-based.

Descriptions: Life and Physical Sciences—Workplace Experience courses provide work experience in a field related to life and/or physical science. Goals are typically set cooperatively by the student, teacher, and employer (although students are not necessarily paid). These courses may include classroom activities as well, involving further study of the field or discussion regarding experiences that students encounter in the workplace.

 

Mini Clinical Curriculum

After an initial two-year preclinical portion, medical students will participate two years of clinical activities in hospitals and clinics. Our Mini Clinical Curriculum is similar to, but shorter version of the clinical disciplines of Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, Surgery, Emergency Medicine, Neurology, Rehabilitation Medicine/Chronic Care, and Geriatrics & Palliative Care.  Students participate in the care of patients under the supervision of certify teacher, medical school faculty, resident physicians, interns, physician assistant, nurse practitioners, and/or medical students. Outside speakers, scientific reading, scientific writing, and presentations are essential parts of these courses. Writing in this course involves students’ personal reflections on their understanding of the topics, workings of disease in society, write-ups case studies, journal entries, and descriptive narratives of the human systems.

 

Clinical Ethics

State Course Code: 14003                                 Subject: Health Science Grade: 9-12       Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring        Prerequisites: Complete MMS Curriculum

Completion Time: Competency-based, one semester.

Descriptions: Provides exposure to key issues in clinical ethics as well as the tools for ethical reasoning and critical thinking that support the student’s current and future work. Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Recognize ethical dimensions of clinical problems in a variety of clinical settings.
  2. Reason through ethical dilemmas and challenges posed in clinical practice.
  3. Discuss the doctor’s historical and contextual responsibilities towards patients.
  4. Justify a course of action.

 

Introduction to Clinical Medicine

Descriptions: Instruction in communication skills and interview techniques to form the basis for the doctor-patient relationship and the skills of communicating with patients are introduced. The patient profile will be obtained. There will be attention to developing comfort in the physician role. The medical history will be introduced and instruction in data collection will begin. There will be further experience in conducting medical interviews with patients for the purpose of obtaining the medical history and patient profile. Special problems related to interviewing will be addressed. The adult screening physical examination will be taught through the use of lectures, audio/visual aids, and small group tutorials where students in supervised settings practice the physical exam on one another. Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:
Professionalism Ethics

State Course Code: 14003                             Subject: Health Science Grade: 11-12     Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring    Prerequisites: Complete MMS Curriculum

Completion Time: Competency-based.

o Develop standards of professional conduct in medicine including: sensitivity and caring towards patients, ethical conduct (especially confidentiality and personal integrity), conscientious self-directed learning, appropriate appearance and demeanor in clinical settings, responsible performance in commitments, and appointments and record keeping.

o Discuss professional development and adjustment to the demands and privileges of being a medical student.

o Describe the meaning of the doctor/patient relationship.

o Discuss and apply some ethical principles in discussion of ethical cases.

o Describe the meaning and value of continuity of care.

 

Medical Interviewing

State Course Code: 14254                             Subject: Health Science Grade: 10-12     Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring    Prerequisites: Complete MMS Curriculum

Completion Time: Competency-based.

o Demonstrate an understanding of the purpose and function of the medical interview.

o Develop interpersonal communication skills and effective interview questioning, listening, and observational skills.

o Understand the concept of the patient’s narrative and its importance in patient-centered interviewing.

o Demonstrate an ability to respond to and deal with patients’ emotions.

o Develop questioning skills to specific populations and situations: pediatric, adolescent, and geriatric patients, difficult interviews, human sexuality/sexual minorities, HIV/AIDS, substance abuse, diversity/culture in medicine

 

Medical database/Documentation

State Course Code: 14157                             Subject: Health Science Grade: 10-12     Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring    Prerequisites: Complete MMS Curriculum

Completion Time: Competency-based, 1 semesters.

o Identify the elements of the complete medical database

o Organize and write-up the medical database clearly and concisely by completing 3-5 patient interviews.

o Able to construct a problem list and understand its function in the Problem Oriented Medical Record.

 

Physical Exam Skills

State Course Code: 14151                             Subject: Health Science Grade: 10-12     Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring    Prerequisites: Complete MMS Curriculum

Completion Time: Competency-based, 1 semesters.

o Perform a standardized basic physical examination and understand the rationale for that examination.

o Demonstrate the correct use of the medical instruments in the performance of the physical examination.

o Develop a systematic approach to recording the basic physical examination.

 

Case Presentation and Clinical Reasoning (Speech)

State Course Code: 01199     Subject: Health Science/Language Arts                Grade: 10-12

Credits: 0.5 (HS)                  Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring        Prerequisites: Complete MMS

Completion Time: Competency-based, 1 semesters.

o Understanding the systematic approach to the verbal presentation of the medical history.

o Understand the clinical reasoning process by contributing to small group discussion and submitting write-ups that demonstrate an ability to perform the first step of the clinical reasoning process, the reporting of patient data.

 

Family Medicine

State Course Code: 14254                                 Subject: Health Science Grade: 11-12     Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring        Prerequisites: Complete MMS Curriculum

Completion Time: Competency-based.

Description: Our Mini Clinical Curriculum is similar to, but shorter version of family medicine. This clerkship stresses ambulatory (outpatient) primary care with emphasis on common problems, biopsychosocial issues (entails thoughts, emotions, and behaviors, and socio-economical, socio-environmental, and cultural) factors, all play a significant role in human functioning in the context of disease or illness), preventive care, and introduction to the role of the primary care physician. Students function in the role of a clerk in a community or residency site and participate in the care of patients using office, hospital, home, or community resources.

 

Internal Medicine

State Course Code: 14254                                             Subject: Health Science Grade: 11-12     Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Summer, Fall, Spring                    Prerequisites: Complete MMS Curriculum

Completion Time: Competency-based.

Description: Our Mini Clinical Curriculum is similar to, but shorter version of Internal Medicine – This basic clerkship serves as a prerequisite for most other medicine courses and clerkships. Currently this clerkship is divided into inpatient and outpatient experience. Students participate in the care of hospitalized patients to refine their skills of taking medical history and physical examinations and to learn to care for the acutely ill. Daily rounds and conferences are held.

The curriculum contains 12 core clinical topics, listed below. For each topic we expect you to see at least one patient with the topic, and hope you will develop the knowledge and judgment necessary to manage a patient presenting with this problem. Management is an advanced skill, and we acknowledge that not all will achieve this goal. The 12 topics are:

1.     Chest pain

2.     Dyspnea

3.     GI bleed

4.     Abdominal pain

5.     Altered mental status

6.     Preventive care

7.     Fever

8.     Hypertension

9.     Diabetes

10.   Electrolyte disorder

11.   Kidney failure

12.   Joint or back pain

 

Surgery Technology and Clerkship

State Course Code: 14056                                 Subject: Health Science Grade: 11-12     Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Spring/Summer                Prerequisites: Complete MMS Curriculum

Completion Time: Competency-based.

Description: Our Mini Clinical Curriculum is similar to, but shorter version of Surgery Technology and Clerkship. First, surgical Technology courses emphasize the care and needs of patients undergoing surgery while covering general health care topics (i.e., patient care, anatomy and physiology, medical terminology, hygiene and disease prevention, first aid and CPR, and laboratory procedures). In keeping with that focus, topics may include operation room materials, tools, and procedures; aseptic surgical techniques; preparation and handling of surgical instruments; efficiency in the operating room; and the roles of various medical personnel who are present during surgery. Second, surgery clerkship introduces the student to the diagnosis and management of problems amenable to surgical therapy. The program is offered which includes instruction in the physiological basis of surgical care, differential diagnosis and decision-making, and the basic principles of surgical management. Active participation in the care of inpatients and outpatients, including participation in the operating rooms, provides practical experience in the application of these skills. Students will be assigned to the surgical service of one of the major affiliated hospitals. A series of lectures (required attendance) and/or discussions expand on major topics related to general, vascular, cardiothoracic, and plastic surgery.

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Geriatric Medicine

State Course Code: 14254                                 Subject: Health Science Grade: 11-12     Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Spring/Summer                Prerequisites: Complete MMS Curriculum

Completion Time: Competency-based.

Description: Our Mini Clinical Curriculum is similar to, but shorter version of Gerontology courses that provide students with knowledge and understanding of the processes of adult development and aging. Topics covered may include the study of the biological, economic, psychological, social, and health/fitness aspects of the aging process.

Pediatrics

State Course Code: 14254                                 Subject: Health Science Grade: 11-12     Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Spring/Summer                Prerequisites: Complete MMS Curriculum

Completion Time: Competency-based.

Description: Our Mini Clinical Curriculum is similar to, but shorter version of PEDIATRICS – This clerkship provides a general introduction to inpatient and outpatient pediatrics. The aim is to expose students to settings where children receive medical and health care services either in an inpatient hospital setting, outpatient department, a clinic, or a series of offices.

 

Obstetrics and Gynecology

State Course Code: 14254                                 Subject: Health Science Grade: 11-12     Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Spring/Summer                Prerequisites: Complete MMS Curriculum

Completion Time: Competency-based.

Description: Our Mini Clinical Curriculum is similar to, but shorter version of OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY – This clerkship experience provides an introduction to the comprehensive medical care and counseling services for adult and adolescent female patients. Students are actively involved in both inpatient and outpatient settings with management and delivery of obstetric patients as well as diagnosis and management of gynecologic conditions and diseases. Students participate in hospital rounds on both obstetric and gynecologic patients, in outpatient clinics, in seminars, tutorials, and are introduced to community health care agencies for women.

 

Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

State Course Code: 14254                                 Subject: Health Science Grade: 11-12     Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Spring/Summer                Prerequisites: Complete MMS Curriculum

Completion Time: Competency-based.

Description: Our Mini Clinical Curriculum is similar to, but shorter version of PSYCHIATRY AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES – This clerkship provides both outpatient and inpatient experiences. Students have primary responsibility under supervision of attending psychiatrists and residents for diagnosis and care of patients. Emergency room, crisis intervention, consultation appropriate to patients with psychiatric dysfunction; familiarity with psychopharmacology, and short-term hospitalization are emphasized.

 

Emergency Medicine Clerkship and Technology

State Course Code: 14055                                 Subject: Health Science Grade: 11-12     Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Spring/Summer                Prerequisites: Complete MMS Curriculum

Completion Time: Competency-based.

Description: Our Mini Clinical Curriculum is similar to, but shorter version of Emergency Medicine and Emergency Medical Technology. First for Emergency Medical Technology course places a special emphasis on the knowledge and skills needed in medical emergencies. Topics typically include clearing airway obstructions, controlling bleeding, bandaging, methods for lifting and transporting injured persons, simple spinal immobilization, infection control, stabilizing fractures, and responding to cardiac arrest. The courses may also cover the legal and ethical responsibilities involved in dealing with medical emergencies. These courses may prepare students to obtain certification in Emergency Medical Response (EMR), CPR, First Aid, Incident Command System (ICS), and Wilderness First Responder. Our Mini Clinical Curriculum is similar to, but shorter version of EMERGENCY MEDICINE – Students work with resident doctor and attending supervision, encountering a wide range of patients, presenting complaints, and levels of acuity, spanning the scope of all specialties and both private and public hospital populations. Learning is primarily through direct patient care experience and bedside teaching, supplemented with lectures and directed readings. Development of the knowledge and skills necessary to evaluate and manage multiple patients simultaneously will be emphasized direct patient care experiences, bedside teaching, and readings.

 

Neurology Clerkship

State Course Code: 14254                                 Subject: Health Science Grade: 11-12     Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Spring/Summer                Prerequisites: Complete MMS Curriculum

Completion Time: Competency-based.

Description: Our Mini Clinical Curriculum is similar to, but shorter version of NEUROLOGY – Students in this clerkship gain a general understanding of basic clinical neurology and to develop neurology exam skills. A combination of inpatient and outpatient experience is the general rule.

Topics: Cerebrovascular disease – stroke syndromes, Coma, Headache – DDX – management, Poisoning – overdose, and Seizures

Rehabilitation Medicine/Chronic Care

State Course Code: 14254                                 Subject: Health Science Grade: 11-12     Credits: 0.5 (HS)

Level: Standard Terms: Spring/Summer                Prerequisites: Complete MMS Curriculum

Completion Time: Competency-based.

Description: Our Mini Clinical Curriculum is similar to, but shorter version of REHABILITATION MEDICINE/CHRONIC CARE – Students in this clerkship are exposed to four content areas: Rehabilitation Medicine, Geriatric Medicine, Palliative & End of Life Care, and Acute/Chronic Pain Management. This clerkship focuses on integrative learning experiences and involves didactic sessions designed around a series of content themes including management of individuals with chronic disease and resultant impairments, disabilities, and prognoses. Didactic sessions emphasize exposure to all four content areas and will include a variety of learning experiences including: lectures, small group discussions, standardized patients, and case presentations.

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