Tuesday, December 29, 2020

About

Tu Luong Foundation established Seattle Mini Medical School (SMMS) in 2019. SMMS is approved by Washington State Board of Education to provide a full grades 6-12 curriculum that focuses on STEM, Medicine, and Medical Mission. Our purpose is to use medical missions to guide, encourage, and educate the future healthcare professionals to have compassion for the poor and needy both locally and globally.


SMMS is a blended learning school using both traditional and online classrooms. Online classrooms allows us to bring doctors, guest lecturers, or experts from anywhere in the world to the classroom using Microsoft Teams and Google Meet. SMMS is designed for students who are serious about pursuing a career in medicine. SMMS provides a way to expose high school students to the basic science of medicine and clinical skills very early in their education. Our medical mission provides students with clinical skills that instill compassion and help students understand the true meaning of medicine and service.

Contact
Email is the preferred method for initial contact. I am a teacher. I do not answer phone during school hours. Thank you for your understanding.

 


Monday, December 21, 2020

International Students

Online U.S. High School Diploma for International Students

Seattle Mini Medical School offers U.S. High School Diploma Programs for students around the world. All International students are welcome to enroll in our online school education program which is accredited by State of Washington Board of Education. International students will get a major benefit to earn an official US high school diploma and transcript without having to travel to the United States. The international programs will reduce the efforts of traveling to the United States and expenses incurred on Students visa (I-20), and accommodation arrangements. 

Online school degree is becoming a popular option for international students looking to advance their education. Online school degree covers a wide range of educational subjects and courses.  Online program offers students the benefits and opportunities to complete their education at their own pace and time. International students will have the opportunity to learn and interact with American teachers daily. In addition, international students will confidently use English in both communicative and academic areas. This helps students prepare well before studying abroad in the future, as they have early access to American subjects, learning styles and culture.

Dual Diploma Program: As a dual diploma program, students continue their country’s education while simultaneously enrolled in our school. Another very important benefit is that most American universities will accept the international student (with an American high school diploma) without requiring the TOEFL or IELTS exams. SMMS will transfer up to 75% of credits from your current high school and count toward graduation requirements. This means that regardless of how many credits a student has earned from a previous school, students must complete a minimum of 5-6 credits at SMMS before a diploma will be issued. For more details, please read credit transfer policy. 

International Students and Credit Transfer Policy: International/foreign (non-US credits) will be accepted when verified and evaluated by Seattle Mini Medical School registrar office or Educational Credential Evaluators (www.ece.org). Students are responsible for arranging credential evaluators to evaluate credits and have a transcript report forwarded to Seattle Mini Medical School. Students are responsible for all fees. Alternatively, students can arrange official transcript forward to SMMS from current school.  We do not accept transcripts directly from students. This is the only method by which SMMS will accept credits from other nations. SMMS requires a course-by-course assessment of all credits transferred.

College courses may be transferred to fulfill high school graduation requirements on a case-by-case basis using the following “Carnegie student hour” to SMMS credit conversion:

3-4 credit College courses = 1 credit at SMMS;

2 credit College courses = 0.5 credit at SMMS;

1 credit College courses = 0.25 credit at SMMS.

Official Records: International students must provide an appropriately authenticated official transcript issued by a governmental authority. Transcripts not in U.S. equivalency must be translated through a National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES) or Educational Credential Evaluators approved translating services.

Program Benefits:

Preparation: Students who plan to study overseas need to prepare themselves to do so. By taking online courses, students can experience the American education system (classes, curriculum, students, and teachers) long before landing in the United States.

Marketability: Applying to University in America can be extremely competitive. By having American high school course credits, students increase their marketability when applying to colleges and universities.

Accredited: Accredited coursework can be used towards obtaining a high school diploma.

Certified Teachers Support: Highly trained, certified teachers are available to support your online learning to earn U.S High School Diploma.

Convenient: Receive American high school credits without having to move abroad.

Inexpensive: Now, to earn U.S High School Diploma is easy and cost-effective, affordable and viable alternative for students without traveling to the United States. Seattle Mini Medical School online education is inexpensive.

Higher Flexibility US Diploma: To get US high school diploma our online courses are guided through a structured and a flexible procedure according to the needs of international students.

More Individual Attention: Your opportunity to online learning is enhanced. Personalized attention is provided to international students.

Future Academic Options: After you have graduated from Seattle Mini Medical School online school with a high school diploma Certification, you can then decide to travel to the United States to continue your University studies. The option is still there to continue and earn a bachelor’s degree Certification- without leaving your home country.


Contact Us

We are providing you with access, options, and empowering you to take control of your education and your future. You now have the same opportunities as any student living in the United States of America. Before enrolling for our US High School Diploma Programs if you have any questions then please contact our Admissions Advisor who will assist with the enrollment process and help you by selecting classes after understanding the purpose and goal for your career.


Email is the preferred method for initial contact. We are all teachers. We do not answer phone during school hours. Thank you for your understanding.

Tan M Lam
tanlam@minimedicalschool.org,






Saturday, April 25, 2020

Medical Missions



Our medical mission team provides much needed medical/dental/optometric care to the underserved population around the world who cannot access health care service due to financial or geographical reasons and to mentor, nurture and train the next generation of medical humanitarian who will serve anywhere in the world. 

Medical mission provides students with clinical experiences that instill compassion and that help students understand the true meaning of medicine and service. Medical mission helps students take their education to the next level.

•Chance to participate in providing health care to poor patients.
•Shadowing the professionals and learn valuable experiences.
•Learning teamwork and leadership skills.
•Hard work and leadership will be reflected in letter of recommendations.
•Develop long lasting friendships and gain valuable cultural experience.

Contact
Email is the preferred method for initial contact. I am a teacher. I do not answer phone during school hours. Thank you for your understanding.

 

Clinical Science


Our Mini Clinical Curriculum is shorter and simplified version of the clinical disciplines of Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Geriatric Medicine, Surgery, and Emergency Medicine. Students participate in the care of patients under the supervision of certified teacher, physicians, interns, physician assistant, nurse practitioners, and/or medical students. Outside speakers, scientific reading, scientific writing, and presentations are essential parts of these courses. Writing in this course involves students’ personal reflections on their understanding of the topics, workings of disease in society, write-ups case studies, journal entries, and descriptive narratives of the human systems.
 
Introduction to Clinical Medicine
State Course Code: 14003 Subject: Health Science Grade: 11-12 Credits: 0.5 (HS). Prerequisites: Complete MMS Curriculum. Completion Time: Competency-based.  

Descriptions: Instruction in communication skills and interview techniques to form the basis for the doctor-patient relationship and the skills of communicating with patients are introduced. The patient profile will be obtained. There will be attention to developing comfort in the physician role. The medical history will be introduced and instruction in data collection will begin. There will be further experience in conducting medical interviews with patients for the purpose of obtaining the medical history and patient profile. Special problems related to interviewing will be addressed. The adult screening physical examination will be taught through the use of lectures, audio/visual aids, and small group tutorials where students in supervised settings practice the physical exam on one another. 

Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:
o Develop standards of professional conduct in medicine including: sensitivity and caring towards patients, ethical conduct (especially confidentiality and personal integrity), conscientious self-directed learning, appropriate appearance and demeanor in clinical settings, responsible performance in commitments, and appointments and record keeping.
o Discuss professional development and adjustment to the demands and privileges of being a medical student.
o Describe the meaning of the doctor/patient relationship.
o Discuss and apply some ethical principles in discussion of ethical cases.
o Describe the meaning and value of continuity of care.
 
Medical Interviewing
State Course Code: 14254 Subject: Health Science Grade: 10-12 Credits: 0.5 (HS). Prerequisites: Complete MMS Curriculum. Completion Time: Competency-based.
Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:
o Demonstrate an understanding of the purpose and function of the medical interview.
o Develop interpersonal communication skills and effective interview questioning, listening, and observational skills.
o Understand the concept of the patient’s narrative and its importance in patient-centered interviewing.
o Demonstrate an ability to respond to and deal with patients’ emotions.
o Develop questioning skills to specific populations and situations: pediatric, adolescent, and geriatric patients, difficult interviews, human sexuality/sexual minorities, HIV/AIDS, substance abuse, diversity/culture in medicine
 
Medical database/Documentation
State Course Code: 14157 Subject: Health Science Grade: 10-12 Credits: 0.5 (HS). Prerequisites: Complete MMS Curriculum. Completion Time: Competency-based.

Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:  
o Identify the elements of the complete medical database
o Organize and write-up the medical database clearly and concisely by completing 3-5 patient interviews.
o Able to construct a problem list and understand its function in the Problem Oriented Medical Record.

Physical Exam Skills
State Course Code: 14151 Subject: Health Science Grade: 10-12 Credits: 0.5 (HS). Prerequisites: Complete MMS Curriculum. Completion Time: Competency-based.

Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:  
o Perform a standardized basic physical examination and understand the rationale for that examination.
o Demonstrate the correct use of the medical instruments in the performance of the physical examination.
o Develop a systematic approach to recording the basic physical examination.

Case Presentation and Clinical Reasoning (Speech)
State Course Code: 01199 Subject: Health Science/Language Arts Grade: 10-12. Credits: 0.5 (HS) . Prerequisites: Complete MMS Curriculum. Completion Time: Competency-based.

Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:  
o Understanding the systematic approach to the verbal presentation of the medical history.
o Understand the clinical reasoning process by contributing to small group discussion and submitting write-ups that demonstrate an ability to perform the first step of the clinical reasoning process, the reporting of patient data.

Internal Medicine
State Course Code: 14254 Subject: Health Science Grade: 11-12 Credits: 0.5 (HS). Prerequisites: Complete MMS Curriculum. Completion Time: Competency-based.

Description: Our Mini Clinical Curriculum is similar to, but shorter version of Internal Medicine – This basic clerkship serves as a prerequisite for most other medicine courses and clerkships. Currently this clerkship is divided into inpatient and outpatient experience. Students participate in the care of hospitalized patients to refine their skills of taking medical history and physical examinations and to learn to care for the acutely ill. Daily rounds and conferences are held.
 
The curriculum contains 12 core clinical topics, listed below. For each topic we expect you to see at least one patient with the topic, and hope you will develop the knowledge and judgment necessary to manage a patient presenting with this problem. Management is an advanced skill, and we acknowledge that not all will achieve this goal.

The 12 topics are: 1. Chest pain 2. Dyspnea3. GI bleed4. Abdominal pain 5. Altered mental status 6. Preventive care7. Fever8. Hypertension 9. Diabetes 10. Electrolyte disorder11. Kidney failure12. Joint or back pain


Surgery Technology
State Course Code: 14056 Subject: Health Science Grade: 11-12 Credits: 0.5 (HS). Prerequisites: Complete MMS Curriculum. Completion Time: Competency-based.
 
Description: Our Mini Clinical Curriculum is similar to, but shorter version of Surgery Technology and Clerkship. First, surgical Technology courses emphasize the care and needs of patients undergoing surgery while covering general health care topics (i.e., patient care, anatomy and physiology, medical terminology, hygiene and disease prevention, first aid and CPR, and laboratory procedures). In keeping with that focus, topics may include operation room materials, tools, and procedures; aseptic surgical techniques; preparation and handling of surgical instruments; efficiency in the operating room; and the roles of various medical personnel who are present during surgery. Second, surgery clerkship introduces the student to the diagnosis and management of problems amenable to surgical therapy. The program is offered which includes instruction in the physiological basis of surgical care, differential diagnosis and decision-making, and the basic principles of surgical management. Active participation in the care of inpatients and outpatients, including participation in the operating rooms, provides practical experience in the application of these skills. Students will be assigned to the surgical service of one of the major affiliated hospitals. A series of lectures (required attendance) and/or discussions expand on major topics related to general, vascular, cardiothoracic, and plastic surgery.
 
Geriatric Medicine
State Course Code: 14254 Subject: Health Science Grade: 11-12 Credits: 0.5 (HS). Prerequisites: Complete MMS Curriculum. Completion Time: Competency-based.
 
Description: Our Mini Clinical Curriculum is similar to, but shorter version of Gerontology courses that provide students with knowledge and understanding of the processes of adult development and aging. Topics covered may include the study of the biological, economic, psychological, social, and health/fitness aspects of the aging process.
 
Pediatrics
State Course Code: 14254 Subject: Health Science Grade: 11-12 Credits: 0.5 (HS). Prerequisites: Complete MMS Curriculum. Completion Time: Competency-based.
 
Description: Our Mini Clinical Curriculum is similar to, but shorter version of PEDIATRICS – This clerkship provides a general introduction to inpatient and outpatient pediatrics. The aim is to expose students to settings where children receive medical and health care services either in an inpatient hospital setting, outpatient department, a clinic, or a series of offices.

Emergency Medicine
State Course Code: 14055 Subject: Health Science Grade: 11-12 Credits: 0.5 (HS). Prerequisites: Complete MMS Curriculum. Completion Time: Competency-based.

Description: Our Mini Clinical Curriculum is similar to, but shorter version of Emergency Medicine and Emergency Medical Technology. First for Emergency Medical Technology course places a special emphasis on the knowledge and skills needed in medical emergencies. Topics typically include clearing airway obstructions, controlling bleeding, bandaging, methods for lifting and transporting injured persons, simple spinal immobilization, infection control, stabilizing fractures, and responding to cardiac arrest. The courses may also cover the legal and ethical responsibilities involved in dealing with medical emergencies. These courses may prepare students to obtain certification in Emergency Medical Response (EMR), CPR, First Aid, Incident Command System (ICS), and Wilderness First Responder.  Our Mini Clinical Curriculum is similar to, but shorter version of EMERGENCY MEDICINE – Students work with resident doctor and attending supervision, encountering a wide range of patients, presenting complaints, and levels of acuity, spanning the scope of all specialties and both private and public hospital populations. Learning is primarily through direct patient care experience and bedside teaching, supplemented with lectures and directed readings. Development of the knowledge and skills necessary to evaluate and manage multiple patients simultaneously will be emphasized direct patient care experiences, bedside teaching, and readings.

Contact
Email is the preferred method for initial contact. I am a teacher. I do not answer phone during school hours. Thank you for your understanding.

 


Biomedical Science

Seattle Mini Medical School’s curriculum is designed for students who are serious about pursuing a career in medicine or any other healthcare professionals. FBS is similar to, but shorter and simplified version of the first two-year pre-clinical portion in the medical school. Outside speakers, seminars, webinars, workshops, hands-on, lecturing, note taking, scientific reading, scientific writing, and presentations are essential parts of these courses. Writing in this course involves students’ personal reflections on their understanding of the topics, workings of disease in society, write-ups of epidemiological and case studies, journal entries, and descriptive narratives of the human systems.
 
Human Anatomy
State Course Code: 03054 Subject: Science Grade: 9-12 Credits: 0.5-1 (HS). Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry. Completion Time: Competency-based, one or two semester.
 
Descriptions: The Human Anatomy course presents the gross structure and function of the human body as it relates to the practice of medicine. By using model and multimedia simulation of surface, radiological, and cadaver anatomy, students acquire a three-dimensional understanding of structural relationships in the living body. Videos illustrating the anatomy of selected regions of the body are available for on-demand viewing. Lectures stress important aspects of anatomy, especially as they relate to medical practice. The Medical Embryology course covers embryologic development from ovulation through birth, and is organized by organ systems. Topics are integrated with Human Anatomy to facilitate understanding of anatomical relationships, selected birth defects, and anatomical variants. Following an introductory overview lecture, the remainder of the course is completed in an online self-study format. Course materials include a complete syllabus with self-study questions, a companion website, a CD-ROM with animations of embryologic development, and supplementary textbooks on library reserve. The course culminates in an informal journal club that explores selected topics of relevance to modern developmental biology and medicine. 

Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe basic principles of embryology and general anatomical concepts.
Develop a broad understanding of the structural organization of the human body at the macroscopic level.
Develop a foundation for physical examination and functional assessment of the human organism.
Describe the thoracic, abdomen, and pelvis cavities and the viscera they contain.
Describe the three-dimensional interrelationships & the general principles of blood & nerve supply.
Describe the gross anatomy of skull, head and neck.
Provide anatomical basis for cross sectional and 3D digital imaging.

Biochemistry
State Course Code: 03059 Subject: Science Grade: 9-12 Credits: 0.5-1 (HS). Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry. Completion Time: Competency-based, one or two semester.
 
Descriptions: The Medical Biochemistry course introduces the fundamentals of modern molecular biology and biochemistry as applied to medicine. The course is divided into four blocks: The first block enhances your understanding of proteins including their structure and function. We explore the basic amino acid building blocks and how differences in structures are manifested into a variety of functional states. The second block explores nucleic acids, macromolecular machines, and their regulation on a molecular level. Sections three and four delve into the intrinsic nature of metabolism. Section three deals with the fundamentals of carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism including a variety of disease states arising from genetic and environmental factors. Section four covers the breadth of lipid metabolism, with major emphasis given to diseases such as diabetes, obesity, and atherosclerosis. 

Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:
Solve problems in diagnosis and treatment of human disease by application of biochemical principles.
Use the primary medical and scientific literature as a resource for learning and problem solving.
Define, describe and contrast functions of genes and macromolecules in normal and pathologic contexts.
Define and describe systemic metabolic biochemistry in terms of genes and molecules.
Deduce therapeutic mechanisms from established molecular mechanisms.
Interpret new medical discoveries in terms of fundamental principles of biochemistry
Explain the molecular basis of diseases that affect cellular function or development.

Cell Biology
State Course Code: 03052 Subject: Science Grade: 9-12 Credits: 0.5 (HS). Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry. Completion Time: Competency-based, one semester.
 
Descriptions: The Biology of Cells and Tissues course consists of lectures and coordinated laboratory sessions that introduce the fine structure and function of cells, tissues, and organ systems of the human body, primarily as observed at the resolution of light microscopy. Emphasis is placed on structure-function relationships between different cell types in human tissues and organ systems, as well as on how alterations in cell architecture and cell behaviors lead to disease. The first part of the course covers the functional morphology of cells and their organelles, the biochemical composition of cellular components and products, features of cell surfaces and cellular movement, and the basics of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The remainder of the course is a systematic survey of the body’s organ systems, with an emphasis on the functions of specialized cell types in each organ. 

Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:
Recognize the structure of the components of the cell.
Explain the correlation between the structure and function of cell components, including organelles.
Predict how dysfunction of cellular elements would affect cell appearance and function.
Identify and describe the components of tissues.
Explain the organization of tissue components and the correlation with function.
Predict how dysfunction of tissue components would affect tissue appearance and function.
Describe the tissue components of organs.
Explain how microscopic structure of organs contributes to organ function.
Predict the effect of dysfunction of cellular or tissue elements on organ appearance and function.
Differentiate organs and tissues by appearance.
Predict the functional states of organs and tissues by appearance.
Describe techniques and tools in study of the structure and function of cells, tissues and organs.
Practice and demonstrate systematic problem-­‐solving skills.
Set up, use and troubleshoot a microscope.
Communicate cell, organ and tissue composition with fellow students and faculty
Practice team skills by participating in team exercises.

Genetics
State Course Code: 03059 Subject: Science Grade: 9-12 Credits: 0.5 (HS). Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry. Completion Time: Competency-based, one semester.
 
Descriptions: The Medical Genetics course introduces basic principles of human genetics and their application to clinical medicine. Topics include chromosome abnormalities, genetic patterns of inheritance, inborn errors of metabolism, multifactorial inheritance, population genetics, gene mapping and identification, genetic screening, cancer genetics, pharmacogenetics, gene therapy, genetic counseling, and ethical issues, and decision-making in medical genetics. The course consists primarily of self-study assignments that precede interactive, classroom-based problem-solving sessions led by a faculty expert in each topic. In-class quizzes are administered to provide students with ample formative feedback throughout the course. 

Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe what genes are, how they are organized and controlled, what they do and how they segregate.
Describe the nature of mutations and permutations and how they contribute to human variability and to disease.
Describe the patterns of inheritance for autosomal dominant/recess, sex-linked, and mitochondrial inheritance.
Describe how genes are organized into chromosomes, mitosis and meiosis, and transmitted from parent to child.
Describe the clinical manifestations of common numeric, structural, and mosaic chromosomal anomalies.
Describe how polymorphism, gene linkage, and human gene mapping are used in medicine.
Describe the multifactorial nature of most human traits, both normal and abnormal, and how inheritance works.
Describe the role of genetics in the pathogenesis of neoplasms and in the predisposition of malignancies.
Identify common molecular and cytogenetic diagnostic techniques and how they are applied to genetic disorders.
Describe the procedures available for prenatal genetic diagnosis and diseases that can be detected prenatally.
Identify and describe the approaches to treatment of genetic diseases.
Students will be able to elicit a comprehensive medical genetic history and construct an appropriate pedigree.
Students will be able to demonstrate sympathy, a non-judgmental and non-directive attitude, recognize their own limitations, seek consultation whenever necessary, and become life-long self-motivated learners.

Immunology
State Course Code: 03052 Subject: Science Grade: 9-12 Credits: 0.5 (HS). Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry. Completion Time: Competency-based, 1 or 2 semester.
 
Descriptions: The Fundamentals of Immunology course introduces the components of the immune system, their locations in the human body, and their interactions in different clinical contexts. Students learn how the immune system senses and attempts to eliminate pathogens, and how selected pathogens evade it to cause disease. First, the genes and molecules that play key roles in the immune system – including antigens, antigen receptors, antibodies, complement, major histocompatibility complex loci, chemokines, and cytokines – are introduced. The interactions between innate and acquired are then discussed. Finally, medically relevant forms of immune dysregulation and intervention are explored, including vaccines, immunomodulators, hypersensitivities, immunodeficiency, autoimmunity, graft-versus-host disease, transplantation immunology, and tumor immunology. 

Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:
Describe the cells, products, and effector responses of the immune system
Describe an immune response from initiation to resolution
Describe T and B cell receptor diversity and antigen recognition
Explain the role of tolerance, when and how it occurs, and consequences of autoimmunity
Compare innate and adaptive immune responses
Describe how pathogens are recognized, presented to the immune system, and how influences vaccine design
Describe and explain the key interactions during T cell and B cell interactions
Describe and compare the four types of hypersensitivity
Explain and compare immune processes during transplantation and tumor immunity
Explain how specific drugs alter the function of the immune system
Explain the consequences of specific immune deficiencies and approaches to treat them
Describe how specific immunological tests function and are used in diagnosis
Describe the immune basis, pathophysiology, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment of a disease
Function as a team member and coordinate an effective presentation
Provide presentation on the important characteristics of a disease, diagnosis, and treatment.
Lead a discussion of a topic and help fellow students understand key issues
Interpret data from experiments and draw appropriate conclusions from the data.

Virology
Description of Course
Structure, classification, replication, and mechanisms of pathogenesis of human and animal viruses.State Course Code: 03052 Subject: Science Grade: 9-12 Credits: 0.5 (HS). Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry. Completion Time: Competency-based, 1 or 2 semester.

Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:
Recognize the structure of viruses.
Describe the replication strategy of viruses.
Explain pathogenesis of diseases caused by viruses.
Identify how viruses spread from person to person.
Recognize an epidemic or pandemic of virus infection.
Describe tools and techniques in study of the structure, life cycle, pathogenesis, and diagnosis of viruses and their clinical signs.
Distinguish replicative virus infection from virus latency.
Explain the role of the immune system in the control of virus infection.
Recognize current strategies to prevent virus infection by vaccination
Recognize current strategies to control virus infection or pathogenesis by immunological intervention.
Recognize current strategies to control virus infection or pathogenesis by pharmacological intervention.
Describe the growth differences between cells transformed by oncogenic DNA and RNA viruses compared to normal cells.
Relate tumor suppressor genes and the control of normal cell growth.
Interpret how tumor suppressor gene products intersect growth and survival pathways and how tumor viruses interact with these molecules and their pathways.
Differentiate the processes involved in the antitumor effects of certain viruses.
Practice and demonstrate systematic problem solving skills in basic and clinical virology.
Integrate strategies learned in the context of virus systems into the design of experiments that address other systems

Neuroscience
State Course Code: 03052 Subject: Science Grade: 9-12 Credits: 0.5 (HS). Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry. Completion Time: Competency-based, one semester.
 
Descriptions: Medical neuroscience is an integrated course that is designed to introduce elements of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neuropharmacology, with illustrations from neuropathology and clinical neurology. Lectures use frequent clinical examples and much of neuroanatomy is taught through extended team-based learning exercises and jigsaw sessions. There are guided topographic and cross-sectional anatomy labs with strong emphasis on correlation with normal radiographic anatomy. Student proficiency is assessed through quizzes and written exams (including a practical exam component), as well as performance in the team-based learning exercise. 

Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:
Define the terms commonly used to describe the nervous system and its functions.
Explain the cellular and molecular basis for excitability, conductivity, synaptic function and plasticity of the nervous system.
Identify and describe the major features of the brain that are identifiable on gross inspection and in coronal, axial and sagittal section.
Identify the organization and distribution of the major blood vessels of the brain and describe the regulation of blood flow and the transit of nutrients into and out of the brain.
Describe general concepts in development and repair of functions of the nervous system and consequences of disruption of these processes.
Explain the formation and flow of cerebrospinal fluid.
Describe the major tracts of the brain and identify the functions and the consequences of damage to the tracts.
Describe the major components of the sensory systems of the nervous system and predict the consequences of damage to these systems.
Describe the major components of the motor systems and predict the consequences of damage to these systems.
Describe the substrates for the major behavioral and cognitive functions of the brain and predict the consequences of damage to these systems.
Describe the control of integrated functions of the brain including neuroendocrine function, autonomic control, emotional regulation, appetite, and sleep.
Describe techniques and tools in study of the structure and function of the brain including neurophysiological and neuroimaging.
Practice and demonstrate systematic problem‐solving skills.
Practice communication of neuroscience concepts with fellow students and faculty.
Practice team skills, including respectful, responsible and professional participation.
Read critically, evaluate, and assess medical information and scientific literature about biomedical topics and questions.
Help colleagues by contributing constructive suggestions

Microbiology and Infection Disease
State Course Code: 03060 Subject: Science Grade: 9-12 Credits: 0.5-1(HS). Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry. Completion Time: Competency-based, 1 or 2 semester.
 
Descriptions: This course introduces the pathogenesis and immunity of infectious diseases, and natural barriers. Microbiology, epidemiology, clinical manifestations and control of representative bacterial, fungal, parasitic and viral infectious diseases are covered. Chemotherapeutics and principles of chemotherapy, sterilization, principles of asepsis, nosocomial and iatrogenic infections are discussed. 

Objectives, at the end of the course, students should be able to:
Compare and contrast essential features of viruses, the prokaryotic cell, the fungal cell, and the mammalian cell.
Describe essential features of bacterial structure, metabolism, genetics, and classification.
Describe essential features of fungal morphology and growth.
Describe essential features of viral structure, genetics, and growth.
Compare and contrast distinguishing features of parasite classes, including the life cycles of parasitic pathogens.
Describe the major classes of antibiotics, including anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-viral, and anti-parasitic drugs, and describe their mechanisms of action, and mechanisms of acquired resistance.
For selected infectious diseases and syndromes:
Identify the pathogens of major importance
Describe the affected populations and modes of transmission
Describe the major clinical manifestations of disease
Explain the mechanisms of pathogenesis
Explain the principles of diagnosis, therapy, and prevention

Pharmacology
State Course Code: 14253 Subject: Science Grade: 9-12 Credits: 0.5 (HS). Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry. Completion Time: Competency-based, one semester.
 
Descriptions: Medical Pharmacology is first approached as a basic biomedical science and later focuses on therapeutics and clinical pharmacology. After a thorough introduction to the general principles of pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics, the pharmacological and toxicological properties of the major classes of drugs are covered. Emphasis is placed on understanding mechanisms of drug-induced modifications of physiological functions. Lectures are supplemented with clinical correlations that explore the rational use of drugs in the management of disease. 

Objectives, at the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:
Enumerate and begin developing skills to interpret information on absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs and apply such information in solving problems
Enumerate, in general, how drugs interact with receptors and the general consequences of such interactions
Identify the major factors influencing the effects of drugs in humans and their interactions with one another
Identify the major classes of and mechanisms of action of antibiotic, anti–cancer, autonomic and cardiovascular drugs and the primary characteristics of major prototype drugs in each class
Identify the major effects and common adverse reactions of major antibiotics and of prototype drugs acting on the autonomic and cardiovascular systems.
Identify common indications, contra–indications and limitations, including major adverse reactions, of a number of classes of clinically important drugs
Describe and appreciate the implications of the placebo effect in human medicine and research.
Medical Seminar
State Course Code: 22106 Subject: Science Grade: 7-12 Credits: 0.5-1 (HS). Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry. Time: Competency-based, one or two semester.
Descriptions: Seminar courses vary widely, but typically offer a small peer group the opportunity to investigate areas of interest. Course objectives may include improvement of research and investigatory skills, presentation skills, interpersonal skills, group process skills, and problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. Seminars aimed at juniors and seniors often include a college and career exploration and planning component.

Scientific Research and Design
State Course Code: 03212 Subject: Science Grade: 10-12 Credits: 0.5-5 (HS). Prerequisites: Completion of Biology and Chemistry. Time: Competency-based.
Descriptions: In Scientific Research and Design courses, students conceive of, design, and complete a project using scientific inquiry and experimentation methodologies. Emphasis is typically placed on safety issues, research protocols, controlling or manipulating variables, data analysis, and a coherent display of the project and its outcome(s).
 
Contact
Email is the preferred method for initial contact. I am a teacher. I do not answer phone during school hours. Thank you for your understanding.

 
 

Academics


Goals

Our goals are for students have the opportunity to graduate with STEM, Medicine, Biliteracy, Career- and College-Ready in pursuing: BA/MD and BS/MD programs (joint-degree) admissions; or top 30 national universities admissions.
 
BA/MD and BS/MD Admissions
BA/MD and BS/MD are dual undergraduate and medical school degrees. Check individual medical school for complete requirements. General requirements are:
GPA: 3.85-4.0 (on a 4.0 scale)
SAT: 1450-1550 (total score: 400-1600)
SAT II: 600-800 Math and Science (Molecular Biology, Chemistry, Physics), or
ACT: 30-34 (English, Math, Reading and Science)


Top 30 National Universities Admissions
General requirements are:
GPA: 3.85-4.00
SAT: 1402-1539
SAT II: 600-800
ACT: 29-33
 
Extracurricular Activities
Leadership: Was the student an officer of the club? Did he/she manage people, lead and organize events? Was he/she elected to increasingly more prominent positions? Leadership is an important characteristic of the strongest applicants to the best universities. Commitment: Did the student demonstrate a consistent, sustained commitment to the club? Did his/her other activities show a distinct interest in that topic or subject? Did his/her high school summer activities correspond to school year club commitments?
 
Record of Excellence: It’s important to show that not only were you president of your school’s Chess Club and captain of the Debate Team, but you managed significant accomplishments. Ways to do this include winning major regional or national contests and expanding the club’s membership. It’s not about quantity, but quality. And it’s better to have two distinct areas of interest and do really well in them, than 5 different areas of interest where your performance is solid but not distinctive.
 
Sample ECs • Volunteer at 3 hospitals: plan to reach 900 hours by the end of senior year (activities included general patient care: cleaning up, talking to, etc., some office work, helping nurses, working in the E.R. helping doctors out, etc.). • Volunteered about 150 hours at a village hospital in India helping out the poor. • Internship with radiologist in Chicago • Went to South Africa and spent the whole summer volunteering to help AIDS patients as well as researching with doctors stationed there, 375 hours of volunteering there.
 
Summer Service Camp/Medical Mission Medical mission provides students with clinical experiences that instill compassion and that help students understand the true meaning of medicine and service. Medical mission helps students take their education to the next level.

Admissions
Non-Discriminatory Policy
SMMS admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, scholarship and loan, athletic, or other school-administered programs.
 
Admission Requirements
Interested parents may make application for their child at anytime. Attendance at SMMS is a privilege and not a right. Each student should value positive attitudes toward the school. The following admission requirements:
• The parents must read, complete and sign the application form. The non-refundable registration fee must accompany the application form.
• Once the application is received, the office will call and schedule an interview with the administrator. The student must accompany the parents for the interview.
• The parents will need to bring all available student records to the interview (report cards, achievement tests, health records, and immunization records must be verified.
• The student must have a satisfactory scholastic and behavioral record from previous school.
• Prospective students may be tested to determine academic preparedness and placement.
• The maximum class size is 16 students. If a particular class is full, the student will be placed on a waiting list. The parent will be contacted as soon as there is an opening.
• Eligible students will be accepted in the following order: Staff member’s children, sibling of student’s enrolled, new students/families
• SMMS does not have the staff or facility to take students with special needs (physical handicaps, severe learning or social difficulties, emotionally disturbed, or history of disruptive behavior).

Registration Checklist
___ Non-refundable application fee (if no slot is available, application fee will be refunded).
___Signed Statement of Cooperation
___Signed Student’s Health History
___Student Records from Previous School (if applicable)
___Birth Certificate
___Immunization Records
___Student Screening
___Parent Interview with the Admissions Committee
___Reference Form Completed (if applicable)
___Financial Aid Packet completed (if applicable)
 
Contact
Email is the preferred method for initial contact. I am a teacher. I do not answer phone during school hours. Thank you for your understanding.

 
 

Thursday, January 2, 2020

Public Lectures


Mini-Med Schools are education programs now offered by more than 70 medical schools, universities, research institutions, and hospitals across the nation. There are even Mini-Med Schools in Ireland, Malta, and Canada! Mini Medical School’s course is designed for adult learners and students, who are interested in learning more about diseases and how the body works. Seattle Mini Medical School’s program is typically a lecture series that provides “mini-med students” information on some of the same subjects studied by “real” medical students without exams. There are no prerequisites to enroll.

Who are the Mini Med School Teachers?
Doctors, professors, researchers, and other healthcare Professional who are changing the way we care for ourselves.
Sample Topics:
Alzheimer’s Disease
Emergency Medicine: Real Cases From the ER
Viral Hepatitis
Sickle Cell Disease
Multiple Sclerosis
HIV & AIDS
Prostate Cancer
Keeping the Beat: Restoring Rhythms of the Heart
Collapsed Lung! How to Treat a Pneumothorax
From Aedes to Zika: the Resurgence of Mosquito-Borne Viruses in the Americas
High-Tech Minimally Invasive Surgery
Advances in Urology from BPH to Erectile Dysfunction
Human Hardware: Hip and Knee Replacement
Physical Therapy: Optimizing Movement Through the Ages
Flaps R US: Reconstructive Plastic Surgery
Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment, with patient presentation
Myths and Realities of Psychiatry: Depression – Diagnosis and Treatment
Psychiatric Drugs
Pathology in the Era of Genomics
Neuroendovascular Coils and Stents: Brain Surgery Without the Scars
Rheumatology: Rheumatoid Arthritis and Fibromyalgia

General Audience: Non-Credit
A fast-paced weekend and/or evening showing the latest research in action
Get a taste of medical school without reading, writing, and exams
An interactive learning experience
This program will explore our current understanding of today’s compelling health issues from diagnosis and treatment to prevention
An opportunity to ask questions
A celebration of hope for everybody

Tuition: $30 per class
Class duration is between 60 to 75 minutes.
Graduates receive a certificate of completion (attending 7 or more sessions)

Online or On-Campus
Highline College
2400 S 240th St
Des Moines, WA 98198

Contact
Email is the preferred method for initial contact. I am a teacher. I do not answer phone during school hours. Thank you for your understanding.